Feta Cheese Nutrition
Jul 29th, 2014 by

Feta Cheese Nutrition
Cheese. Just a mere mention of the word and one would think of sumptuous appetizers or meals served with them. Cheese, when served with wine, depicts impeccable taste and class. Here is but one of the many varieties of cheeses: Meet the Feta Cheese.

Look for fresh feta cheese in the chilled deli section of most supermarkets. Originating from Greece feta was made by peasants on the lower Balkan peninsula from sheep or goats milk. Feta is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months. It is a crumbly cheese and has a slightly grainy texture. Once removed from the brine it dries out rapidly. For many feta is an acquired taste and the aroma of it has been likened to the smell of bad feet.

Havarti has a buttery aroma and can be somewhat sharp in the stronger varieties. The taste is also buttery, and from somewhat sweet to very sweet, and it is slightly acidic. It is typically aged about three months, though when it is older it gets more salty and has a hazelnut flavor. When left at room temperature, the cheese tends to soften quickly. Flavored variants of Havarti include: cranberry, caraway, dill, peppered, jalapeno and garlic.

Radish make a very satisfying crop because they grow really fast. It is a member of the mustard family and is related to cabbage, horseradish and turnips. Theradish nutritional benefits date back to 2000 B.C. A healthy radish is firm to the touch and has a bright reddish color with green leaves that are great for juicing.

You have to have good nutrition in order to function all day and to be able to participate in physical activities. The FDA has developed the food pyramid to help people learn how to eat the right combination of foods to have a healthier lifestyle. Unfortunately, many people aren't consuming the right balance of foods they need to maintain their long term health.

Kale is versatile, inexpensive, (a large bunch often costs less than $ 1.50) easy to cook and teeming with nutrients and minerals, taking top marks in almost every nutrient category. A one-cup serving of kale provides 354% of the recommended daily value (DV) of Vitamin A, 89% of Vitamin C, 1328% of Vitamin K, 10% -20% of Calcium, depending on the variety, and about 15% of dietary fiber.

You can substitute half or all of the higher fat ingredients. Be creative. For example, combine yogurt, garlic powder, lemon juice, a dash of pepper and Worcestershire sauce and use it to top a baked potato instead of piling on fat-laden sour cream.

Pregnancy and nutrition have a vital relationship and it is essential for women to have a well balanced meal. She has to provide her growing baby with minerals, vitamins, and other nutrients which are essential for the healthy growth of the infant. On the other hand there are some food items which should not be eaten as they can become hazardous to the mother as well as the developing baby.

Read about beauty guide. Also read about how to mend a broken heart and how to get over a broken heart.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Nutrition For Pregnancy
Jan 22nd, 2014 by Aldouspi

Nutrition For Pregnancy

How do you make sure that you have a healthy nutrition pregnancy and that you are on the right track?

Making sure that you truly have nutrition for a healthy pregnancy is one of the most important things. Not following a proper nutrition and specific pregnancy exercise is something that can cause not only a lot of harm to your own body but also that of the child growing inside of you.

It is very important that you are following all of your doctor's orders and having yourself all the vitamins and nutrients so that you can have a pregnancy with little complications.

Skipping meals, eating poorly, and trying to diet while pregnant can be serious threats to the development of the baby. After the first trimester, in fact, a woman should add around 300 calories a day of healthy and nutritional foods. She should expect to gain an average of 25-30 pounds during her pregnancy.

Below is a list of special nutritional needs during pregnancy.
(If you are not sure if she is meeting these needs should consult her doctor)

Iron supports the growth of the fetus and helps a woman produce more blood. If the mother does not get enough iron, the fetus will take the iron it needs from her blood. Pregnant women should get about 30 milligrams (mg) of iron a day. Most women do not start pregnancy with enough iron in their blood. The doctor may prescribe an iron supplement to prevent iron deficiency anemia.

Foods that contain iron include meat, poultry, fish, legumes such as beans, and whole-grain and enriched grain products. Iron from animal products is better absorbed by the body than that from plant sources. Eating good sources of vitamin C, such as citrus fruit, broccoli, and tomatoes, can help the body absorb more iron.

Folic acid is key to the development of the spinal cord.

It helps make new cells and genetic material. Its most important job is helping to prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida.

During pregnancy, the recommended daily amount of folic acid rises to 600 mcg. Based on the woman's medical history and test results, the doctor may recommend 400-800 mcg of folic acid a day. Many foods are fortified with folic acid, including those made with enriched flour or grain products, such as bread and rice. This makes it easier for a woman to get all the folic acid she needs before and during pregnancy. Other food sources include green leafy vegetables such as spinach and broccoli, dark yellow vegetables, and fruits such as mangoes, papaya, peaches and pumpkin, beans, and nuts.

Calcium and phosphorus help to form the bones of the fetus. The RDA for calcium is 1,000 mg for most pregnant women over age 18, and 1,300 mg for pregnant women under age 18. If a pregnant woman does not get enough calcium, the fetus will take what it needs from calcium stored in her bones. Milk, yogurt, and other dairy products are the best sources of calcium. Other sources include tofu with added calcium, calcium-fortified orange juice, sardines, salmon with bones, and dark green leafy vegetables such as collard greens, kale, and mustard greens. Vitamin D works to help the body use calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D is found in fortified milk and sunshine.

If you want to learn more, visit: Nutrition for a Healthy Pregnancy for everything you ever wanted to know about pregnancy healthy eating.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

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