Childhood Nutrition Tips
Mar 26th, 2014 by

Childhood Nutrition Tips

Many families today lead incredibly busy lives. Amid the hustle and bustle of a chaotic lifestyle, parents may begin to worry about whether or not their children are receiving adequate nutrition. Since adequate nutrition is so important to a child and the child's ability to grow healthy and strong, it is not surprising to find parents seeking out innovative methods of ensuring that children get the right amount of vitamins and nutrients. While giving a child a daily vitamin supplement is certainly a positive measure, there are other things that parents can do to ensure that their child is getting adequate vitamins and nutrients.

Some children are super picky when it comes to eating and this can cause a parent great concern. How does a parent get a child to diversify his or her diet without struggling with the child? The key is to stick to it and to continue to introduce healthy foods into the child's regular diet. Even if a child seems to prefer the same foods time and time again, introducing new foods will eventually help the child in identifying things that he or she enjoys eating. If choosing to introduce new, healthy meals and snacks a parent should refrain from overwhelming the child with too many new or strange foods as well. Children are more apt to appreciate new food introductions if they are not constantly seeing something different appear on their plates. 

To encourage a desire for new foods, the parent may want to ask the child to help with creating meals; when a child feels like they have control over what they are eating, they can begin to feel better about new food introductions. Children might also enjoy developing a weekly or monthly meal plan; this will help the child develop a sense of stability and meal expectancy, and will further promote quality family time together with parents. While developing meals and meal plans the parent can take special time to teach the child about cooking, nutritional facts, and the parent can also teach the child about super healthy food choices and selections. To make meal preparation a complete lesson, the child should also be encouraged to shop for foods, to cut coupons, and to learn how to save money on food buying endeavors as well if the child is old enough to do so. In addition, children can be taught about healthy snack food selections and how to make their own healthy snacks.

Parents concerned about a child's food intake should also make every effort to eat together on a consistent basis. Researchers have proven that family meals and gatherings are a positive time for children as well as parents. Sit down meals encourage the intake of adequate nutrition and families get a better chance to communicate with one another during meals as well. What's more, when a family takes the time to eat meals together, the parent can monitor what foods a child is eating better, the child develops excellent manners, and the child is encouraged to openly socialize with parents and siblings.

Robin Reichert is an AFPA Certified Nutrition and Wellness Consultant. She has been studying natural health, wellness, nutrition, and physical fitness for over 10 years and holds an MS in Natural Health from Clayton College. She is also pursuing a personal trainer certification through American Fitness Professionals and Associates. Her passion is to educate and empower people to take charge of their health and fitness. To learn more, please visit Robin's Wellness Resource Center at http://www.wellness-bee.com

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Chronic Fatigue Nutrition
Mar 5th, 2014 by Aldouspi

Chronic Fatigue Nutrition

Chronic fatigue nutrition starts with a sound diet. To end chronic fatigue, it is crucial to get your body in balance. By that, I mean to drastically cut white sugar and processed flour from your diet. Cut back on fried foods and fast foods and move towards a living diet. A living diet mainly consists of fruits, nuts, and vegetables. Take a minimum of 3 weeks and get rid of all the caffeine in your diet. No coffee, no tea, no pop (soda).

Once you get your diet in order, the next thing to look at when it comes to chronic fatigue is nutritional supplements. One of the more popular supplements being looked into right now is creatine. A study was published in the June 2004 issue of the Journal of Applied Physiology. The result was that creatine was found to affect mitochondria which are part of the cell which produces energy for biological functioning. In layman's terms, it helps cell function, nervous system function, and muscle function which means it is a positive for those who suffer from chronic fatigue. If you are thinking about taking creatine, may I just throw out a word of caution on a personal note. Creatine supplementation requires you to drink plenty of water. Bodybuilders use is to push water into the muscle which makes them look bigger so you may see some weight gain while using this supplement.

L-Glutamine or glutamine is a supplement which may enhance/support human growth hormone levels (HGH). There are some researchers in the chronic fatigue community who feel that there is a condition called leaky gut syndrome. The long and short of it is that if you suffer from leaky gut syndrome which in itself may lead to chronic fatigue syndrome, you are not getting adequate nutrition if the foods that you ingest.

By taking L-Glutamine over a period of several months, some have come to realize that their "leaky gut" is no longer an issue, the food that they eat is better put to use, and the symptoms of chronic fatigue go by the wayside. As an aside, glutamine is very helpful for those that have low blood sugar levels.

Well that about does it. Hopefully you can take a tip or two from the article and drastically improve your CFS!
http://www.squidoo.com/chronic-fatigue-nutrition

Edible Education: Nutrition, Health, and Diet Related Disease

Patricia Crawford, M.P.H. DR.P.H, RD, Director, Robert and Veronica Atkins UC Berkeley Center for Weight and Health Robert Lustig, M.D., Author SPONSORED BY ...
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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